haimtheblog:

new old 501’s

haimtheblog:

new old 501’s

(via thedeathoftheauthor)

ficklephoebe:

Christina Hendricks for Health Magazine, photo courtesy of Tom and Lorenzo

ficklephoebe:

Christina Hendricks for Health Magazine, photo courtesy of Tom and Lorenzo

(via urbnite)

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green. 
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

weedporndaily:

Colorado Airport Clarifies Marijuana Rules and Eases Confusion for Passengers
(CannabisNow) The Telluride Regional Airport Authority is attempting to walk a fine line between Colorado Law and Federal Regulation. The board voted this past March to install signs at The Telluride Regional Airport (TEX) advising passengers boarding flights that they risk prosecution if they enter federal airspace with marijuana. The signs will be placed at various locations throughout the airport.
Sales and possession of cannabis in Colorado is legal, however, airspace remains under federal jurisdiction. Previous board minutes have discussed whether to ban marijuana from airport property; the decision was tied four to four and tabled for future discussion.
“We’re respecting Colorado state law; you can legally possess marijuana, but once you leave the airport by air, you’re subject to federal law,” Jon Dwight, Board Chairman of TEX told Telluride News. “Once flights are in air, you’re in federal airspace. There’s been no direction yet by the [Federal Aviation Administration] or the Department of Transportation, so we’ll wait to see what direction they give airports in states where they’ve legalized marijuana.”
The new signs will read: “While the possession/use of marijuana is legal in Colorado, it is illegal in federal airspace under the Controlled Substance Act. If you are departing this airport by air, you will be entering federal airspace.”
Read more

weedporndaily:

Colorado Airport Clarifies Marijuana Rules and Eases Confusion for Passengers

(CannabisNow) The Telluride Regional Airport Authority is attempting to walk a fine line between Colorado Law and Federal Regulation. The board voted this past March to install signs at The Telluride Regional Airport (TEX) advising passengers boarding flights that they risk prosecution if they enter federal airspace with marijuana. The signs will be placed at various locations throughout the airport.

Sales and possession of cannabis in Colorado is legal, however, airspace remains under federal jurisdiction. Previous board minutes have discussed whether to ban marijuana from airport property; the decision was tied four to four and tabled for future discussion.

“We’re respecting Colorado state law; you can legally possess marijuana, but once you leave the airport by air, you’re subject to federal law,” Jon Dwight, Board Chairman of TEX told Telluride News. “Once flights are in air, you’re in federal airspace. There’s been no direction yet by the [Federal Aviation Administration] or the Department of Transportation, so we’ll wait to see what direction they give airports in states where they’ve legalized marijuana.”

The new signs will read: “While the possession/use of marijuana is legal in Colorado, it is illegal in federal airspace under the Controlled Substance Act. If you are departing this airport by air, you will be entering federal airspace.”

Read more

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